Air Canada Faces Firestorm Over Response After Staff Lose Dog At Airport

CANADA STOCKS-TSX flat with eye on U.S. budget talks; golds weigh

The local CBS TV station took interest in Larry’s disappearance and says it asked the airline about its procedures after obtaining a statement about the incident. Instead, the station says it accidentally received an email from spokesman Peter Fitzpatrick urging his colleagues to ignore the inquiry — and what sounded like a jab at the U.S. government shutdown. “I think I would just ignore, it is local news doing a story on a lost dog. Their entire government is shut down and about to default and this is how the US media spends its time,” the station said the email read. Word quickly spread online, with many voicing their outrage over the company’s response. “If you ever fly with your pet, you might not want to choose Air Canada,” one wrote on Twitter. The airline addressed the controversy in a statement Friday. “Air Canada acknowledges inappropriate comments were made in response to a reporter’s follow-up questions for additional details regarding Larry,” it said. “However, Air Canada has been providing the best available information to media on this matter. These comments do not reflect Air Canada’s standards or professionalism, and do not refer to the search for Larry by Air Canada employees which is ongoing.” Larry’s temporary owner said she was furious when she heard about the message. “I was angry…

“The TSX is of course adversely affected today by the drop in precious metals in particular … you also had that announcement by Potash pre-warning,” said David Baskin, portfolio manager and president of Baskin Financial Services “Add that all up, and that’s why Canada is not following the U.S. uphill.” After recording its biggest jump in three months in the previous session, the Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index finished the session down 2.30 points, or 0.02 percent, at 12,892.11. President Barack Obama and congressional Republican leaders worked to end their fiscal impasse on Friday but struggled to strike a deal on the details for a short-term reopening of the government and an increase in the U.S. debt limit. Failure to raise the borrowing limit would have serious repercussions for the fiscal standing of the United States, the world’s biggest economy, and for markets and economies of the United States and other nations worldwide. Investors, who are also looking ahead to the start of the earnings session soon, hesitated to make calls until there was certainty about a resolution to the crisis. “We’re certainly sitting on the sidelines,” said David Cockfield, managing director and portfolio manager at Northland Wealth Management. “I just keep my head down for the moment.” “I want to see some actual results before I make up my mind how this is going to turn out,” he added. “I don’t think it’s over until it’s over.” Five of the 10 main sectors on the index were higher Friday. The financial sector gained 0.4 percent, with Royal Bank of Canada climbing 0.5 percent to C$68.03. Energy shares added nearly 0.5 percent, with TransCanada Corp rising 1.2 percent to C$45.33. Encana Corp added 2.1 percent to C$18.30.